Prince Snow Farm

2.22.2017

What I'm Growing {Part I}

It's February vacation, and this 6th grade teacher only has one thing on her mind…FLOWERS!

This is the week I decide what varieties to grow again, and which ones didn't quite meet my expectations. I'm also venturing into new varieties, as my quest to be a part-time flower farmer is expanding at a speed that I seem to have no control over! It's just kind of "happening". And I love every single detail! My word of the year, PURPOSE, sure is taking itself seriously. 

I hope you'll join me as I share my must haves for flower growing 2017 here at Prince Snow Farm.

{Dahlias} Oh my. Last year I decided to give them a try. Not just the one or two I've grown in an ornamental garden…but 60 tubers collected over the winter with hopes of making an attempt. And WOW did they produce! They are very late bloomers here in coastal Massachusetts…but once they start, they just don't quit. I was picking dahlias well into the fall!And now I have hundreds of new Dahlias to plant. Hopefully I divided them correctly!




{Zinnias} Zinnias have always been a favorite. I plant them close and hardly thin. I encourage long stemmed plants by NOT pinching. Zinnias will produce for me from early to mid-July until first frost. They are my staple flower. I strip all leaves on Zinnias before creating bouquets…so even a little powdery mildew or insect damage will not harm this star of the garden! ( I direct sow after the last frost has passed, and stagger the planting by two weeks) The Benary Giant varieties are my favorites.

 {Snapdragons} I grew a lovely rose-hued variety from seed. (Look in the center of the round vase photo). I didn't have great luck..but I love them enough to try again. Mine were VERY late to bloom,and not especially prolific. They seemed to take a long time to get established once planted out. Opinions? Suggestions?


{Sunflowers} My majestic backdrop…just love them. I grow a small branching variety to mix in multi-flower bouquets, and a larger variety to sell in sunflower bouquets. Plant the larger varieties closer for more manageable head size when making bouquets. I am expanding my sunflower space to about 5x its previous space!



{Nasturtium} Nasturtium are so easy. I direct seed in any old soil and trail the stems over fences and spilling from planters. Nasturtium can add such vibrance to a mixed bouquet. I especially enjoyed crafting this ENTIRELY edible bouquet.

{Cosmos} Cosmos have such slender stems that I treat them like a filler instead of as a main component of my bouquets. But this "filler" sure puts on a show. They add an air of beauty that keeps me coming back. I always direct sow Cosmos after the danger of frost has passed. Double Click Mix is a favorite. I tend to plant Cosmos as a backdrop, allowing the front rows to lend support.




{Limelight Hydrangea}  Our two Limelight Hydrangea bushes have grown into trees as tall as our house in just a matter of a few years. The blossoms keep on coming, even when traditional hydrangeas aren't blooming due to harsh winter temps. They also dry beautifully at the end of the season for indoor arrangements.

{Queen Anne's Lace} Although viewed by some as invasive and a nuisance, QAL was a great and persistent filler. I grew from seed and planted out in a raised bed. Hoping it comes back this year…I'll get back to you on the invasive piece!


{Bronze Fennel} Oh Fennel, how I love you! You attract copious bees (yes, I am a flower farmer who is OK with pollen!). You are vibrant, you are edible, and you make the most imaginative flash of color in my bouquets. So yes, I let you spread into any raised bed you want. You are always welcome here. 

{Lavender} I usually harvest for drying, but also love adding a few almost gone by stems for height. Lavender is a must have.

{Gladiolus} Glads have gotten a bad reputation. Often associated with funerals…but man are they gorgeous. I pick when just a few blossoms are open. I love the yummy sherbet mixes. Glads have a stem height that is hard to findgo for it!

I'm not even halfway done!

I'll be back later this week with more suggestions! 

In the meantime, please leave me YOUR favorites in the comments section.

Happy planning!

xo
Monica @prince snow farm 







13 comments:

  1. I grow most of what you do, but haven't had luck with Lavender, (wish I did), and haven't tried Dahlias...yet!

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    1. Oh Michelle try them! Even 5 tubers. They are glorious.

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  2. This all sounds wonderful! I will really enjoy watching you this year. We won't be in our new house in time to plant all of these but I'm here cheering you on! ;)

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    1. I'm so glad you will be along to garden with me! Cannot wait to see your home!

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  3. Wonderful flowers colour everywhere.
    Merle.........

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    1. Thanks Merle! Gets me through the winter!

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  4. I love dahlias, in our climate we have to dig them up every fall and store them over the winter. Zinnias are a favorite also. My grandfather grew every single variety I think, and gave us long tours of his gardens.

    Best of luck in finding new and intriguing plants, I stand to learn from you.

    Jane x

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    1. Hi Jane. We dig and store too. A bit of a chore but hopefully worth it. I had trouble seeing the "eyes", and hope I split right! Zinnias are so easy and so joyful!

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  5. What beautiful flowers, I love them all!
    I remember zinnias from my childhood, we called them "old maids".

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    1. Thanks Kay! I never knew they were called old maids. I love little historical gardening tid bits!

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  6. oh, this is just what i needed to color our February-blah world! I just started with dahlias 2 years ago and oh, i am so in love with them too. Hoping to get some more colors from my sister this spring! I always plant zinnias and marigold for their hearty long-season showiness. (Thank-you for the tip on stripping the leaves for bouquets!) A lot of my flowers are perennials that bloom year after year. You make me want to try more annuals. Nasturtium really caught my eye!
    Your photos are gorgeous! thank-you for sharing...(and hugs for your mother-heart as we send 'youngsters' off to college:)

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    1. Thanks Janet. As I am learning from many flower farmers, they plant lots of annuals! Thanks for the compliments, and college will be tough on this mamma

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  7. Did you get some of the snow that came to MA this last weekend?!?!? It's finally warming up here, but we JUST had snow. I'm not sure when spring will be here to stay!

    I'm definitely dreaming up what I'll be putting into the ground this year. I'm doing zinnias again for sure. Along with cucumbers, green beans, and sugar snap peas. I want to pick one new vegetable and maybe one new flower, but I haven't decided what they will be.

    Have you ever started chives from seed? I tried last year and NOTHING happened. I bought the seeds, so it shouldn't be that they were "duds". I'm just not sure what went wrong.

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Thanks for chatting!

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